Beginning a Healthy Journey

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What if you could for one moment consider starting yourself over?  Sort of like a new plant.  It needs tending, tender loving care, the right foods, a just perfect location and most of all – personal attention.

Isn’t that what we all crave?  Oh, we know that life has not always treated us fairly – or in truth, that we have not treated ourselves well at all.

Well, I am tired of myself.  I need a change.  In attitude and in action.  So now is the time to get started (after all, I’m not getting any younger!).

There is an inspiring challenge going on over at Tiffany Lambert’s Claiming My Power blog.  It’s a realistic get healthy type of challenge – we’re not talking training with Jillian at the moment – but things we can do for ourselves, right now. Starting – well, yesterday  so we have a bit of catching up to do.

Tiffany mentioned a nutritionist that she trusts at Healthy Lifestyle Balance so I’m starting my day reading over the website, taking notes and readying myself to jump into this, determined to see results this time.

I believe it is a lie that older folks cannot lose weight and get themselves healthier.  Certainly it may take longer than the younger generations because of natural aging issues — but I refuse to believe that it cannot be done.

I’m taking the challenge and will use this site to keep myself honest about it.  I strongly suggest that you take a look at Tiffany’s challenge and consider joining in.

I’d love to take that wee, growing plant and turn it into a blooming beauty like this:

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Letting Go of Last Year

ice bucketThe presents have been opened, the wrapping paper tossed and the “after” sales were wild this year.

Now it’s time to move along to face the next thing on the list.

New Year’s Day 2014

A new beginning – fresh start – a do-over.  If only, right?

How about doing something different this year?  Forget about the resolutions that, from year’s past experience, are good for about 2 week.

This time, really let something go – disappear – poof – gone.

As you make your goals for next year list, consider letting something go from last year.

Didn’t get the job you were hoping for?  Let the disappointment go, don’t carry it over into 2014.

Still carrying around those extra 25 pounds?  Stop putting it on every years list of resolutions.  This time plan to eat more healthy, small portion meals and let the regret go.  It’s emotional baggage that is not necessary.

Do you forget to do things, do you put stuff off until the very, very last minute?  We all do.  I will not procrastinate ever again is probably at the top of most people’s New Year’s Resolutions List.  Stop beating yourself up.  (this is something I have to leave behind this year, too)

It’s a new year use a notebook, your iPhone, a spoken reminder on a recorder – heck, call yourself and leave a message on your own answering machine… find a way to remember to get to things on time – but let the regret for not doing it better before slide away.  It’s done.

We spend so much precious time looking back at what we should’ve done – that we forget to enjoy what we are doing right now.

It’s a new year – start looking forward and let the past be… past.

 

 

A Simple Self-Care Plan For 2014

butterfly take careAs the year winds down and we welcome 2014 into our lives, I have a very simple wish for you.

Take care of you.

There is no one, not your husband, your wife, your daughter, your son, your grandchildren or your parents – that is more important than you.

You take care of everyone else, right?  Remember to take care of yourself this coming year as well.

Don’t Forget To:

  •  Take your medications as directed.
  • Visit your doctor when you need to, not when the problem has gotten worse and needs more care.
  • Give yourself a break, take some time for just you.
  • Live, Love and Laugh – a lot.
  • And most of all, enjoy every single day.

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Caregiver Depression Reality

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Many of us are caregivers.

Some to children, others to a spouse, even more to parents or grandparents who can no longer live safely at home without help.

As a caregiver myself, I can speak firsthand on how significantly the daily demands of tending to a loved one can take a toll on someone.  Physically.  Emotionally.  Mentally.  Financially.

As the Baby Boomer Generation ages, more of our children will take on the role of taking care of us – as we once took care of them.

My son is the person in my life who needs me as a caregiver.

It is a fact that depression is high in caregivers.  And, let’s face facts – there is a reason for that higher percentage.  We tend and give until we sometimes lose ourselves in the giving and forget to take care of us.

I want to make addressing “Depression in Caregivers” a part of this site because I feel it is an important subject.  One that many caregivers will suppress or refuse to acknowledge.  In my opinion.. that is a mistake that can cost lives.

If you take care of someone in your life – I hope this section of Healthy Living Decisions will be of help to you.

Image credit:  MorgueFile.com

Depression Symptoms

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While each person who suffers from depression will present slightly different symptoms – in general these are some to be aware of.

Some of the symptoms of depression include:

  • feeling guilty, helpless, worthless
  • having little energy to do anything
  • sleeping too much
  • unable to sleep
  • eating more than usual
  • no interest or desire for food
  • things that once were enjoyable aren’t any more
  • withdrawing from friends, family and life
  • finding it hard to make decisions
  • overwhelming sadness
  • feeling empty
  • nothing matters anymore

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms for longer than a few weeks, please talk to your doctor.  There are ways to help.  It does not mean you are “crazy” – it does point to a chemical imbalance in the brain that can be helped with medication or other treatments.

Talk to your physician – they are your first line of defense against depression worsening.

Image from MorgueFile.com